Goalie Bible

ResSlayer
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Goalie Bible

Post by ResSlayer » Sun Feb 28, 2016 1:33 am

*Disclaimer* I am going to be stating everything in this guide as if it were matter of fact, however please note that this is all just my opinion on the best way to goaltend. There are other legitimate ways to approach certain aspects of goaltending that I disagree with, but I do agree that if something is working it doesn’t matter how it looks.

The purpose of this guide is to hopefully spark some new interest in learning more about the goalie position, and to increase the quality of zealot hockey as a whole. Everyone can benefit from knowing more about goalies. On offense, you need to score on them, on defense you need to protect them, and when you are the goalie in those random opt situations, the quality of those games will significantly improve with basic understandings of the mechanics. In the most broad interpretation that I can possibly put it, I would say goaltending is all about analyzing situations, weighing probabilities, and taking both objective/subjective action accordingly depending on the situation. I often think to myself how much harder it would be for a goalie to do his job if every skater understood what makes a goalie do what he does, and how much easier goalies would have it if they knew what to do and when to do it. I am going to go over nearly everything I’ve learned about goalie in the 1.5ish seasons and 2000+ games that I’ve played, and I hope everyone can take something away from this guide to improve their game play. The guide is very long, and in many cases concepts require understandings of each other to be understood properly. Having said that, I’ve tried to condense it all as much as possible while not leaving anything out, so I hope there is enough interest for a few potentially great goalies to stick through until the end of it.


Table of Contents (Ctrl+F)

Chapter 1: First Opportunity Snipe Goaltending
Section 1.0: Introduction
Section 1.0.1: Definitions
Section 1.1: Point of Reaction
Section 1.2: Gauging Shot Power
Section 1.2.1 Mechanics That Manipulate Shot Power
Section 1.2.2: Improving Shot Gauging
Section 1.3: Putting It All Together
Section 1.4: Common Mistakes
Section 1.5: Notable Snipers to Test
Section 1.6: Conclusion


Chapter 2: Positioning
Section 2.0: Introduction
Section 2.1: General Positioning
Section 2.1.1: Snipe Positioning
Section 2.1.2: Repositioning
Section 2.1.3: Miscellaneous Positioning
Section 2.1.4: Advanced Positioning
Section 2.2: Conclusion


Chapter 3: Advanced Shots
Section 3.0: Introduction
Section 3.1: Advanced Snipe Goaltending
Section 3.2: Drive Goaltending
Section 3.3: Crease Goaltending
Section 3.4: One Timer Goaltending
Section 3.5: Breakaway Goaltending
Section 3.6: Shootout Goaltending
Section 3.7: Conclusion


Chapter 4: Meta
Section 4.0: Introduction
Section 4.1: Knowing the Opponent
Section 4.2: Common Shots
Section 4.3: Controlling the Skater
Section 4.4: Techniques
Section 4.4.1: Post Bounce
Section 4.4.2: Peripheral on Skater
Section 4.4.3: Meta Stone Cold
Section 4.4.4: Boosting at the Skater
Section 4.5: Conclusion


Chapter 5: Optimizing Defensive Synergy
Section 5.0: Introduction
Section 5.1: General Coverage Responsibilities
Section 5.2: Advanced Coverage Responsibilities
Section 5.2.1: Using Bad Defense to Your Advantage
Section 5.3: Conclusion


Chapter 6: Improving Decision Making
Section 6.0: Introduction
Section 6.1: Developing Muscle Memory
Section 6.2: Deciding with Increased Delay
Section 6.3: “Evac”
Section 6.4: Trying to be a Hero, Risk vs. Reward
Section 6.5: Conclusion


Chapter 7: Impacting Your Team Outside of the Net
Section 7.0: Introduction
Section 7.1: Game Sense/Map Awareness
Section 7.2: Being the Foundation of Your Team
Section 7.3: Passing
Section 7.4: Advanced Passing
Section 7.4.1: Preventing Sharks
Section 7.5: Conclusion


Chapter 8: Mentality
Section 8.0: Introduction
Section 8.1: Why That Skater Scores on You Easily
Section 8.2: Confidence
Section 8.3: Preventing “Cracking”
Section 8.4: Preventing Boredom
Section 8.5: Conclusion


Chapter 9: Accelerating Improvement
Section 9.0: Introduction
Section 9.1: Practice and Critical Thinking
Section 9.2: Replay Analysis
Section 9.3: Playing the Opposite Role
Section 9.4: Learning From Other Goalies
Section 9.5: Distinguishing Fault
Section 9.6: Improving Reaction Time
Section 9.7: Remedying Common Bad Habits
Section 9.8: Conclusion



Chapter 1
First Opportunity Snipe Goaltending


Section 1.0: Introduction

The most common shot in zealot hockey is the snipe both in lower level pubs and high level zhl. For those looking to not take goaltending too seriously and just want some basic information, this section is by far the most important. When the defense knows their goalie can handle snipes, they can focus their defensive efforts more productively into such things as pressuring the puck, or restricting passing lanes. If you are looking to take your goaltending to the next level, it is counter-productive to invest time learning and improving more advanced techniques without completely mastering snipe goaltending first. The techniques that are used in this guide are also transferable to most other shots you will face as a goalie, which serves as further incentive to learn it properly. Some terms I have coined for the purposes of this guide are “point of reaction,” “reacting on release” and “first opportunity shot.”

Section 1.0.1: Definitions

Point of reaction- This is the moment where you can no longer save the shot by reaction.

Reacting on release- This is when a goalie instantly uses an ability in response to a skater releasing a puck, instead of waiting to see the direction of the shot.
ex. You see the offense has an opportunity for a one timer against you and you know the shot power is high. Reacting on release would mean using an ability when the puck controller releases his pass regardless of where it goes. Reacting not on release would mean waiting to see the direction of the puck before reacting. If the skaters shot went wide to the wall by accident and you did not use an ability it means you did not react on release. Note this scenario and the correct way to deal with it will be expanded upon in later sections.
[+] Reacting on release, shot on net
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[+] Reacting on release, shot not on net
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First opportunity shot- This is the moment of time where the skater will have his first opportunity to shoot a threatening shot at the goalie. Any shot that is taken on you before or up to your point of reaction while you have your forcefield is considered a first opportunity shot, however it is usually snipes around the distance of the defensive faceoff circles. To guarantee the save against all potential angles, the goalie will have to use his forcefield whether the skaters decides to shoot or not.
ex. Assume you can reactively save a shot at Point A that is 80% power which is your point of reaction, and assume Point B is a location closer to your net than Point A. When a skater has 80% power at point A, and doesn’t change directions while he reaches Point B, you know that you cannot reactively save his snipe and that he has passed your point of reaction. If he already shot a snipe before this point and you reaction saved it, he took a first opportunity snipe that was savable by reaction. If he holds the shot and shoots just past your point of reaction, he took a first opportunity snipe that you had to preemptively use your forcefield to save. If he holds past your point of reaction, your forcefield should be used to prevent his potential shot even though he did not take it. The last situation means that the skater passed up the first opportunity shot.
[+] Visual of First Opportunity Snipe+Point of Reaction
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[+] Point of Reaction changing with the skaters position, Forcefield used when point of reaction passed even though shot not taken
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Section 1.1: Point of Reaction

Be comfortable with your point of reaction. This forms the foundation of nearly all your decisions as a goalie. If you misjudge this, you will misjudge everything onwards like a domino effect and you will be crippled as a goalie. You do not need to have an amazing reaction time, you could have 200ms ping and still be able to do well adjusting for it. But of course, goaltending consistently well at the highest level requires a fast reaction time. What you lack in reaction time can be made up for in judgement, however it removes the need to judge and risk in increasingly more amounts of situations. The average reaction time is around 250ms, and the average ping is around 50. I believe that 260ms delay is enough to not significantly bottleneck your potential as a goalie, and 350ms delay is enough to hold your own in zhl. Being able to accurately gauge the pucks power will also make this much easier, explained in Section 1.2.

Section 1.2: Gauging Shot Power

This is probably going to be harder for newer players, but for older players this should not be an issue at all. Gauging the shot power is crucial when goaltending snipes because you need it to more accurately judge your point of reaction. You can improve this by putting an effort into paying attention to how long the skater has held the puck without changing direction vs the shot power.

Section 1.2.1 Mechanics That Manipulate Shot Power

a) When a skater initially starts to charge the puck it will charge at a faster (~25%) rate than normal. However if he changes direction at all after already charging the puck, the increased speed will disappear. Vapour has mastered this technique and is why his quick snipes are so effective when the situation presents itself. You should almost always assume the puck holder has this added bonus unless you see him change directions at least once which is over 90% of the time.
[+] Increased speed of initial charge shot power shown
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b) Boost will increase the power of a shot around 15-20%. Note that this power comes from the skaters momentum and does not actually increase the shot power meter.

c) In situations where you must expose your short side, shots directed to the short side will reach the goal line around 1-3% faster than shots directed to the far side depending on the angle.

d) Aiming behind the net will increase the power of a shot around 1-5% depending on how far. (don’t need to worry about this too much)

Section 1.2.2: Improving Shot Gauging

As mentioned earlier the best way to improve shot gauging is just by paying closer attention to it. This test is supplemental and I personally find it very helpful before games on servers where I have higher ping.

While standing in the default goalie position have your skater charge his snipe to 100%. Left click once to indicate that you are ready, and have him shoot the puck within 3-10 seconds.
Use your force field on release, you should not be waiting to see the direction the puck is travelling, and the moment you see something change on the screen you should forcefield. Even if he moves his stick position by accident, that movement should trigger you to use your forcefield. Using the defensive faceoff rings as a benchmark, adjust the distance from which he shoots and make note of which shots you can handle. Note that the skater should be aiming so that it will not hit your immortal but also not so that it will dodge the force field as well.
[+] Point of Reaction Test
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Section 1.3: Putting It All Together

Once you are comfortable with your point of reaction and can accurately gauge shots, you need to understand the importance of reacting on release with your forcefield. Shots in zealot hockey happen in a split second giving the goalie extremely limited time to think about what they want to do. Goalies will often not react on release because they want to see the direction of the shot, or they just do not know they should. It is extremely important to know that you cannot afford to do this when the shot is too close to your point of reaction. If the shooter takes his snipe way before your point of reaction then it is okay to not react on release, however if it is taken near your point of reaction then you must react on release with your forcefield. You can see that reacting on release improves your point of reaction, which is the main reason why it is so important. This also means that you cannot move or flinch (very rarely is it okay to do this, expanded on later) in the moment that you react on release, and your position with your force field must be covering all sniping angles from the current puck holder. Of course positioning properly and repositioning efficiently is extremely important with this method of snipe goaltending, and that will be expanded on in chapter 2.

Section 1.4: Common Mistakes

The majority of people that struggle with goaltending snipes do so because of the following mistakes. Note that when “unnecessarily” is used, it does mean doing the “mistake” is warranted at times but the situations are rare and covered later in the guide.

Covered in Chapter 1:
-Being greedy with abilities and holding force field during the first reaction snipe unnecessarily
-Misjudging their point of reaction
[+] Error
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-Waiting to see the shot direction before reacting when there is no leeway to do so. Note that in this example the skater has not passed the goalies point of reaction, but since he did not react on release, he was late.
[+] Error
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To be covered in Chapter 2 Positioning:
-Using boost unnessarily causing potential follow up shots to be harder to save. The GIF cut off the ending, but it is showing that the goalie used his forcefield and boost when the skater released his puck, even though the goalie clearly had the angle completely covered.
[+] Error
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[+] Full Version of clip shown above
https://vid.me/8s5j
-Flinch repositioning right before hitting forcefield unnecessarily
[+] Error
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-Poor coverage positioning. The goalie reacts on time but is not in position.
[+] Error
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-Repositioning inefficiently and too slow
[+] Error
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Section 1.5: Notable Snipers and Goaltenders to Learn From

Proster Watermelon Vapour PeterDLai Fable Bulbasaur Rush

The following are just outlining the basic unique qualities that sets them apart from the average sniper. I could elaborate paragraphs describing each top zhl skaters sniping style alone but it will take too long. It goes to show how important knowing specific players is when you are goaltending and more of that will be expanded upon later in the guide. The players listed are not the only skilled snipers in zealot hockey, I just felt this list represents the different types of snipes that a goalie will face the best.

Vapour is amazing at the quick snipes using the added power boost from the initial charge. Watermelon and Proster are experts at being versatile with snipes, both are very good at consistently landing the far post snipe after the force field dissipates. Proster is better at landing the short side gaps more consistently, while water finds deceptive angles better/maintains deceptive shot power better. PeterDLai is an aimbot and is a good test for positional snipe defending. Fable is great at creating room for his snipes and staying in threatening angle positions. Bulbasaur is the undisputed king at landing the short side gap no matter how small. Rush is a coward.

Section 1.6: Conclusion

If your goal is to become a top zhl goalie you need to be able to stop first opportunity snipes at a 95%> consistency, and in my personal opinion 99%. This is because the first opportunity snipe is solely the responsibility of the goalie to cover, and if you cannot cover this yourself you will severely cripple your team's ability to defend more advanced shots. It is also absolutely crushing to a team's morale when a preventable snipe goes in the net. Whether it’s an ih where people will rage at you (or if its eu everyone will be happy fun times) or in zhl where a lot more is on the line, you cannot afford to let these snipes in. This is strictly for preventable snipes where the first opportunity shot is clear and the goalie just decides to be greedy holding the force field, or positions poorly, or just misjudges the point of reaction. Remember that it is pointless to try to save a “hard” save if you have to let in 3 “easy” ones to get it. In cases of a breakaway it is sometimes better to hold the force field since the shooter has so much room to work with, and a snipe going in is sometimes okay (usually not, expanded on later.) Advanced snipe goaltending will be expanded upon later in the guide, such as what to do after the force field dissipates and they did not opt to take the first opportunity shot etc.


Chapter 2
Positioning


Section 2.0: Introduction

Every save a goalie makes is accredited in one way to another to how he positions himself. It is by far the most elementary and fundamental aspect of goaltending, and nearly every real life sport where it is applicable. This chapter is absolutely prerequisite to understanding the entirety of this guide, and understanding the goalie position.

Section 2.1: General Positioning

Whichever way you approach positioning, there should be a common goal in everyone of them. Provide the best coverage to the most probable shot that you will face, while also setting up your abilities to be used to their maximum potential. The method used in this guide assumes that general positioning is essentially snipe positioning. This is because as soon as the opposing team has the puck, they can potentially snipe whenever they have shot power. Constantly repositioning yourself allows for you to potentially hold your forcefield longer as it allows you to react on release, which in turn allows you to have a better point of reaction.

Section 2.1.1: Snipe Positioning

The vast majority of your time actively repositioning as a goalie will be devoted to preventing snipes. Chapter 1 explains reacting on release and the point of reaction, however these do nothing if you are not in the right physical place with your goalie. This style of snipe goaltending requires the goalie to be covering all potential snipe angles from the current puck holder without moving at the instant of the shot. You should not need to boost and force field at the same time, however it is okay to boost after you already used forcefield if there is no threatening rebound potential, and you can see the direction of the shot is sharp. Another situation where it is okay is if the shooter boosts sharply to get at another angle, however you must time your forcefield and boost to cover both sides. This takes quite a bit of skill, but once the technique is learned it can be done surprisingly consistently. The reason it works is because shots directed at the short side reach the goalie faster than the far side, as detailed earlier. For the rest of snipes which I believe to be over 90.00%, you should not boost after using your forcefield.
[+] Timing abilities to cover both sides of skaters potential shot, can also be used with one timers
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Section 2.1.2: Repositioning:

Repositioning properly and efficiently is crucial for any goalie regardless of their style. In this guide, we will explore the method I personally use, which I call the “Triangular Semi-Circle” method. Only glue your stick right onto the post if the skater has committed so far towards your net on a horizontal scale, and so far up/down on a vertical scale that your shield will cover the far side shot completely. If the skater has not committed this far your stick should not be glued to the short side post. The more in the middle on a vertical scale the skater is, the farther out of your net you must be on a horizontal scale, and the more up and down the skater is you must also follow. The result is what the title suggests as a moving triangularly around the semicircle of the crease. Always keep your stick pointed to the short side of where you are positioned, as the shot will potentially reach the short side faster than the far side. It takes practice to do this clean and efficiently, however the skill used in this technique is transferable to certain aspects of blocking advanced drive shots. At the end of the day you can do the method that works for you, if you are able to position yourself so that you can reactively stop snipes on release without moving the instant the skater shoots, that is enough.
[+] Triangular semi circle repositioning
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Section 2.1.3: Miscellaneous Positioning

When your defense is recovering a puck behind your net and is being pursued by the other team, you should have your goalie on the outer part of your net as an option for him to pass to you. When your team has the puck in the opposing zone, have your goalie in default position, and press spacebar to center your screen to your immortal instantly. When your team has the puck in your zone do not move incase they pass back to you.

Section 2.1.4: Advanced Positioning

Advanced positioning for specific shots will be covered in the next 2 chapters.

Section 2.2: Conclusion

I’ve always found it really interesting how much of real life sports translates into online games physically, mentally and in practise. In every sport I’ve played competitively in real life, positioning and footwork was almost always what separated the good players to potentially the best players. Having the base fundamentals down allows you to do everything else more efficiently and consistently. Without it, everything from a basketball crossover, to a badminton smash, to a soccer kick becomes much much harder. The same principal applies to zealot hockey, if you don’t spend time learning and mastering the basics and fundamentals, you will have a much harder time executing harder techniques. It is at this point in the guide that the basics end and the advanced begins.


Chapter 3
Advanced Shots


Section 3.0: Introduction

The following sections outline the most common shots in zealot hockey excluding the first opportunity snipe. Chapter 4 goes farther in depth into potential shots that you will face.

Section 3.1: Advanced Snipe Goaltending

You did the right thing by using your forcefield to block the first opportunity shot, however the shooter did not take it. It is up to your defense to pressure/steal the puck and/or block the shot. Generally speaking if you have someone in the middle guarding your far post stay short side no matter what jukes he does unless you expect your defense to make a mistake. If there is no defense at all, you unfortunately need to guess which side he will shoot. Generally most skaters will shoot far side, and you can increase your chances further by knowing the specific shooters style.
[+] Changing stick direction to far side right when forcefield dissipates
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Section 3.2: Drive Goaltending

This is usually when the skater does not opt to take the first opportunity snipe and/or gets past the defender on him. If you have your forcefield, you need to treat his boosting towards the net just like any snipe and use your forcefield when he reaches your point of reaction. If you don’t have your forcefield, you will most likely have a defender near the net and you can use his positioning to predict what the shot the skater will shoot. The more time the skater has to stay in a threatening position, the harder it will be for you to stop his potential shot, and it is the responsibility of the defense to limit this time. Generally speaking, the skater will choose to shoot short side if he is already committed to a side, or if there is a defender guarding the middle of the crease. If the skater has used his boost to get past your defender, use it to your advantage by recognizing that his potential angles are limited. It is important to not be too eager to make a “hero save” which is expanded on in chapter 4.

In this example, the skater clearly has no first opportunity snipe as he is constantly changing directions which the defense should be forcing him to do. However, once he uses his boost there is a threat and the first opportunity shot arises closer to the net than normal.
[+] Example
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Section 3.3: Crease Goaltending

This is usually near the later stages of a skater's drive. Typically the skater will position himself towards the center as much as he can to give himself a better angle. Just like snipe repositioning where you need to come out of the net when the skater is more centered, you need to do the same here for better angle coverage. This is extremely important when there is a click battle near the net as the majority of them will be at the center. It will be very tempting to boost in these scenarios, but the majority of the time staying between the skater and goal line while only using stick repositioning will be the best option.

The goalie is glued to the short side providing poor cover for the skaters potential shot as there is no defense and the skater is threatening the far side.
[+] Poor crease positioning
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[+] Proper crease positioning
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Section 3.4: One Timer Goaltending

The biggest decision you need to make when goaltending one timers is whether you have enough time to reposition+forcefield, or if you must boost/pre boost to save the potential shot. If you can afford it, you should always reposition and force field over boosting, which is why knowing your point of reaction and accurately gauging shots is huge to doing this properly. If you decide that you have to boost to save the potential one timer, make sure to bounce off the post, and make sure you account for which angle your defense is covering if any. Keep in mind that you can cheat with the reposition+forcefield, however a snipe to the short side will punish you.
[+] Blocking one timer with reposition+forcefield
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[+] Blocking one timer with boost since there is no time to reposition+forcefield
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Section 3.5: Breakaway Goaltending

If there is defense catching up to the offensive skater, you can afford to play a bit greedy. If your defender is about to be in steal range, make sure to use your forcefield as the skater will usually just want a shot on net before the defense contests. If the breakaway is uncontested, you need to meta him to save the shot in most cases which is explained in chapter 4. If the skater is at your crease and juking back and forth without his boost available, it will be ideal to have outter crease positioning for better angle coverage. Keep in mind that many skaters will opt to just snipe assuming that the goalie will save their forcefield, and that you can use techniques from shootout goaltending here as well.

Section 3.6: Shootout Goaltending

While a shootout may seem similar to a breakaway it is somewhat different. Generally you want to save your boost for a possible steal on the skater if he holds too long. Use your forcefield to react to a potential snipe as long as you can and once it passes your point of reaction move your stick back and forth instead of using your forcefield. In general you want to save your forcefield for when the skater boosts around the net, because in shootouts you cannot afford to boost with the skater in most cases.
[+] Shootout example
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Section 3.7: Conclusion

There are many shots that a goalie will face, and while the skills required to stopped them are largely transferrable, adjustments will be required as well. This chapter has covered only the broad aspects of each type of shot, and to understand each better will only come with practice.


Chapter 4
Meta


Section 4.0: Introduction

This is where mind games come into scoring and goaltending. A skater can use the fact that you are more likely to react to the highest probability shot and choose to hold the puck to meta it. To save meta shots you have to treat it as any other factor in your decision making process. Say shot A is 60% and shot B is 40%, and there is a series of 4 shots. If the skater chooses to shoot shot A 3 times in a row, shot B becomes 70% and shot A becomes 30% because the shooter is more likely to change what he is doing on offense. This is a very broad example but it represents the general idea of how meta shooting works. Generally speaking, goaltending meta shots means not preemptively using your boost and just standing strong in the net.
[+] Example of stopping a difficult shot with proper use of goalie meta
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Section 4.1: Knowing the Opponent

Knowing what each skater specifically tends to do should weigh into your decision making process very heavily. Each skater will play against different goalies differently even though they have a set amount of shots they are comfortable with. If you know that a skater knows that you never let in snipes, and you know that he believes a snipe will never go in on you, then you can be more greedy with your forcefield. If you know that a skater is capable and will most likely shoot a boost shot across the crease faster than you can reaction save it, you might need to preemptively boost against him more than you would to others (careful if he fakes the boost, need to factor in how likely defense is going to cover the boost shot.) If you know that a skater very rarely shoots a normal one timer against you then you should be less likely to boost save it, and use your movement instead. Many skaters are not comfortable shooting far side and prefer to get the goalie to bite with a boost so they can get a shot where they have more freedom with aim. There are many more player specific tendencies that you will find as a goalie, and it is important to make a mental note of them as you keep playing. It comes down to finding a balance between knowing what a skater prefers to do, and what the skater will most likely do.
[+] Goalie knows that the skater knows that he has his forcefield and is a fast reaction speed goalie. In response, the goalie reacts on release but in the opposite direction
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Section 4.2: Common Shots
[+] Meta snipe to the short side, must not fall victim to the common mistakes outlined earlier
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[+] Normal boost shot shown in preparation for next visual
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[+] Meta boost shot stopped
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Section 4.3: Controlling the Skater

When one thinks of goaltending, reactive actions come to mind. While that is the case for the majority of the time, there are times where you can give skaters a taste of their own medicine. You cannot always let the shooter dictate the pace of your reactions, and making a save using this method is much more rewarding than other save you can make. I personally really like to use this method as it raises the skill cap of a goalie by quite a large margin. An example of this would be playing along with a skaters jukes on purpose, knowing that given a certain string of stick turns he will always do the same shot. Assume a skater starts top then jukes bottom then jukes top and shoots. If the goalie is starting top he can turn his stick to the bottom while instantly turning it back to the top to save the shot. This creates the illusion to the skater that the goalie did react to his juke and he will be less likely to realize that you timed your stick turns rather than doing them reactively. This can be extremely complex and can be as simple as baiting a short side gap when you have your forcefield ready.
[+] Baiting short side snipe from skater
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Section 4.4: Techniques

I am excluding many techniques that can be used effectively, because this usually comes down to what works for each specific goalie. The following outline some of the ones I use more commonly.

Section 4.4.1: Post Bounce

The name says enough. It just takes practice to do consistently, and practice to recognize when you have enough distance to reach the post. You should not overuse this and waste your boost too early too often. Instead you want to sometimes use this technique to cover a shooters first opportunity shot when he does not snipe, or cover a one timer with the added security of centering yourself incase he holds.
[+] Example of post bounce
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Section 4.4.2: Peripheral on Skater

I use this technique against certain skaters if they are on the crease against me and I have no abilities off cooldown. It is basically focusing your direct vision on your goalie and letting the skater do his jukes in your peripheral vision. I’m not sure if this will work for other people but you can try it out and see if it helps.

Section 4.4.3: Meta Stone Cold

There is a difference between stone cold, and meta stone cold. If the skater did not have an opportunity to shoot past you assuming you did not move from your position, this is the normal stone cold and is what usually happens. Meta stone cold is when there is an opening in the net, and you anticipate that the skater will shoot to your stick instead of shooting to the gap. Skaters choose to shoot on goalies differently for the most part so just see where it works and who it works on for you.
[+] Example of meta stone cold
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Section 4.4.4: Boosting at the Skater

You should only do this when the skater has committed his forward momentum in a straight line and/or has slowed down. This works great in shootouts and at certain times during breakaways. You should never do this when you have your defense already set up.

Section 4.5: Conclusion

It is important to note that having an unpredictability factor can be a huge asset. The meta game adds a very complex mental layer of the game which you cannot expect to read perfectly every time. It is often the job of your defense to limit the chances the offense gets to hold in threatening positions, where a potential meta makes the goalie have to guess. However it is still the goalies responsibility to make the decision that will yield the highest save possibility, which that is why you need to learn the meta of skaters, and the meta available to goalies.


Chapter 5
Optimizing Defensive Synergy


Section 5.0: Introduction

Defense is not a requirement to be a successful goaltender. It has a strong correlation to a goalies success, however a team does not need to have a strong defense in order to succeed. Often times teams that are weaker in defense make up for it with offensive pressure, which at times can have a bigger impact on lowering the opposing team's goals scored than traditional defense. Also, I believe three skaters that are all average defensively is much stronger than one skater that is extremely good defensively with one or two that are bad defensively. Whether you have good or bad defense, you can use both to your advantage as a goalie, but it is first important to know the coverage responsibilities.

Section 5.1: General Coverage Responsibilities

In the broadest sense of coverage, the goalie is typical responsible for the short side of the current puck holder, and the defense is responsible for the far side. If the play is in the early stages however, the defense is responsible for covering passing lanes and pressuring the puck while the goalie is responsible for covering the first opportunity snipe. The goalie is expected to stay on the short side if there is a defender protecting the middle of the crease.

Section 5.2: Advanced Coverage Responsibilities

Many shots you face will not be as simple as goalie short side defender far side. You have to adjust to what your defense is covering at the time because there are times where he is caught out of position and you have to adjust your positioning as well. The better the defender you have is, the more you can afford to trust him to make a certain move. An example of this would be if an offensive skater beats the defender on him, and another defender rotates to him. The defender having rotated doesn’t have time to completely guard him so he moves toward the middle guarding the far shot. You have to weigh the probability of him trying to beat the defender vs. trying to beat you, and whether or not your point of reaction is fast enough to boost when the skater passes the middle point where the defender will cover the short side. Advanced coverage responsibilities follow this style of decision making, and you will often have to adjust to where your defender is at the time. I personally prefer the defensive style of having one defender on one skater at all times and having no one at the crease for a number of reasons, but it is preference.
[+] Ideal scenario defense covers properly, goalie covers properly, defense blocks shot
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[+] Goalie boosts prematurely by trying to be a hero when defense already had the shot covered
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This is a grey area. While the defense should have done more to prevent or block the shot, especially after the skater commited, the angle of which the skater boosted to is so far commited that the goalie should instinctively use his boost. In my personal opinion the fault if the shot went in is around 50/50.
[+] Grey area scenario
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This is the defensive skaters fault. It is just like the previous shot where the goalie is expected to boost once the skater commits, however the skater chooses to hold and the defense fails to cover the far side and/or clear the puck.
[+] Defense is at fault
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Section 5.2.1: Using Bad Defense to Your Advantage

You can use your defense’s poor coverage as a way to help you predict what their offense will most likely do. Assume a hypothetical where a defender is trying to cover a one timer lane and you can clearly see that it isn't covered. If you are familiar enough with the puck holder to know that he will most likely see, land, and choose to attempt the one timer pass, then you should be ready reposition with x or boost to save the shot potentially on release if it has passed your point of reaction. This scenario is just a single example and the concept is applicable in many situations.
[+] Defense fails to cover one timer lane, however that is used to aid goalies decision making process
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Section 5.3: Conclusion

It is good to rely on defense if you can trust them to what you expect them to do. It comes down to accurately reading the situation as you normally would, but adding in your defense as an additional factor to weigh in your decision making process. More often than not you will have to adjust in some way to what the defense is covering at the time. If you find yourself constantly blaming your defense for goals that you let in, try a different approach of using it to predict what the opposing offense will do.


Chapter 6
Improving Decision Making


Section 6.0: Introduction

After you can accurately analyze situations and weigh the probabilities of each outcome, it will come usually come down to taking the route that gives you the best % to save the potential shot. Keep in mind that most of improving as a goalie comes down to practice and critical thinking which is expanded on in chapter 9. Instead, common issues that goalies tend to struggle with are outlined in this chapter.

Section 6.1: Developing Muscle Memory

Developing muscle memory will decrease the time between making your decision and executing it. This just comes down to practice and developing good habits.

Section 6.2: Deciding with Increased Delay

It is really hard to goaltend efficiently with increased delay if you do not have defense. A common mistake goalies will do is try to save every shot preemptively, thinking their reaction time is so bad to the point where they cannot save any shot on reaction. You need to step back and judge your point of reaction objectively, and ideally before your game starts. Generally you want to stay short side and force your skater to take shots that force him to use his aim and get by the defender. While you may not get a shutout using this strategy you will certainly limit the goals against you by a significant margin. It comes down to knowing how much delay you are really taxed with, and considering it as a factor in your normal decision making process.

Section 6.3: “Evac”

There is a big difference between using your boost properly and the term people use known as evacing. Evacing is when you use your boost when the probability that the skater could and would land the shot you preemptively boosted for, was lower than the probability that the skater could and would hold the puck to bait a reaction out of you. Most of the time turning your stick to the direction you are tempted to boost towards is enough to cover the angle instead of boosting for it. Being able to reposition efficiently and effectively will make you more comfortable with holding your ground. It is sometimes even the “safer” play to boost. An example would be when a boost will cut off a committed offensive skater, and your defense is catching up fast enough to steal it if he tried to hold it instead of shooting.

A stick turn would have prevented the goalie was afraid of.
[+] Example
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If the goalie turn his stick instead of boosting, higher chance to save the shot. Note the split second turn before going back short side to control the skaters shot.
[+] Example
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Boost was warranted as the skater had an angle that a stick turn could not save. Note that you shouldn’t always boost just cause the skater has the angle, which was explained in Chapter 4.
[+] Example
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Section 6.4: Trying to be a Hero, Risk vs. Reward

This is when you choose the lower probability and evac, but do so intentionally just to meta the shooter. It is like soccer shootouts where the cross is easier to aim and has more power while the opposite is harder to aim and has less power. Assuming the goalie thinks 60%/40% between the two shots, but knows he has went towards the 60% option too many times before in a row, going for the 40% option may be correct. The extreme fails of hero boosting that you should avoid, is usually when the goalie could have just blocked the shot the skater was threatening by turning his stick instead of boosting.
[+] Example, same as an example shown before
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Section 6.5: Conclusion

The key mistake goalies tend to make outlined in this chapter is using their boost when a stick direction change would have covered the shot they were trying to stop with their boost. Keep in mind that if there is a legitimate threat it is sometimes the safer play to boost, and understand the difference between evacing, and making a weighted decision to stop a shot you feel will most likely happen. A helpful mental note you can make is that making a “hard” save is pointless to try to save if you have to give up 3 “easy” saves along the way.

Chapter 7
Impacting Your Team Outside of the Net


*Disclaimer* The aspects of this chapter involving play making with your team do not apply in non competitive games. Don’t give unwarranted advice in regular IH games unless you know the person you are talking to will receive it positively.

Section 7.0: Introduction

Goaltending extends far beyond actually blocking shots that are heading towards the goal line. Since a large part of the goalies job is to analyze the opposing team's offense, he should be able to point out mistakes or say what the defense is doing well. Having good game sense and map awareness makes it so that you can use your down time as a goalie to help your team. Passing is also very important for a goalie as it is where the majority of your team's offensive plays will begin from.

Section 7.1: Game Sense/Map Awareness

A large part of game sense can be transferred from other games and real life sports. An example would be the third man in zealot hockey when facing a breakaway. He is supposed to prioritize staying in between the shooter and goalie, only going for steals when there is no risk involved unless he is confident of the skaters next move. The exact same thing goes for soccer most of the time, especially the part about staying on the man, not letting him completely bypass you for any reason. This is just one example, and of course real life sports and zealot hockey have their differences, but the game theory is surprisingly similar in many scenarios. At a badminton club I go to, there are 4 courts. 2 are reserved for beginners, 1 for intermediate and 1 for the highest level. I’ve been there since its creation and there has never been any set rules on how to divide skill levels, it just worked out that way. I’ve always been surprised at the similarity to how zealot hockey works in progressing from pub, to lower ih, to upper ih. These similarities can be used to better understand the game. Map awareness can be a big factor in games as well. An example would be an enemy skater abandoning defense to cherry pick a shot, if your defense doesn’t realize this you can tell them to get back. If you don’t know what your skaters are supposed to be doing you can’t give them any meaningful advice during the game.

Section 7.2: Being the Foundation of Your Team

When assisting your team with words, your overall goal is to contribute positively to your team’s morale more than it is to point out errors. I’d say it would be better to only point out errors in game if it is repeated often, and if not then save it for after the game when there is time to review the replay. If you notice one skater is using his boost too aggressively and repeatedly playing as if no one can steal from him, which is leading to 2 on 1s for your team, it might be a good idea to mention it. If you notice a skater is winning every click battle, or is landing really good transition passes, or cutting off every one timer lane, it is always good to mention it. If your opposing goalie is boosting pre emptively to every one timer attempt, don’t be afraid to use your pause to talk things over with your team and figure out what needs to be different and what is working. This is also another reason why the first two chapters are so important. A team will be less likely to be receptive to their goalies feedback if the goalie lets in 2-3 easy goals due to poor fundamentals. Unless you are pointing out something specifically your defence did wrong that is repeated and pressing, do not blame them for a goal that goes in. Even if it is mostly the defense’s fault, suck it up and keep the team in the game mentally.

Section 7.3: Passing

When passing as a goalie, you need to take the fastest passing option that has a low risk of being cut off. The longer you wait to pass, the weaker your team's offensive transition becomes, and the harder it comes to find a pass. However, if your team is not positioning themselves to receive a safe pass, then it is fine to hold onto the puck longer than normal. You need to find a balance between getting the pass off as fast as possible, and determining the safest passing route. Note that if you have cursor boost enabled your power from boosts will be lower than from a normal boost, and you shouldn't increase your shot power when you don't need to as it makes the pass harder to catch.

Section 7.4: Advanced Passing

Certain players prefer you to ignore the person guarding them and don’t mind if you pass it to the enemy skater next to them for them to resteal from. Certain players would prefer you to pass to them as the third man so they can control the play. It comes down to preference for the most part. A good way to mislead your opposing team is by pointing your stick one direction and passing off the boards in the opposite direction. You can also make your skater boost for your pass if it will lead to a breakaway, but generally you want to let your skater save his boost.

This is assuming there is another skater at the bottom and you are moving down to draw your opponents to him, while you pass to the open man at top.
[+] Example
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Section 7.4.1: Preventing Sharks

Use your crease and focus. There is really nothing else more important than that for shark prevention if you understand it properly. The shark cannot go through your crease, if you do not pass across your crease you are either forgetting that, or you are tunnel visioning to a single skater without realizing that there will always be 1 skater completely open when you have a shark on you.

The skater cannot pass through the crease. Boosting through him to get a pass off means you are most likely tunnel visioning to a single skater.
[+] Example
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[+] Example
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Section 7.5: Conclusion

The goalie position has potential to swing the game inside the net as well as outside the net. Being the position with the most downtime, it is ideal for the goalie to be paying attention to what needs to be different during the game. You waste this opportunity with a lack of understanding about what the skaters are supposed to be doing, which is giving up a lot more than you might think. When passing remember to not tunnel vision to a single skater, and remember that there are two others somewhere around the rink as well.
Last edited by ResSlayer on Tue Mar 01, 2016 8:21 am, edited 31 times in total.
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Re: Goalie Bible

Post by ResSlayer » Sun Feb 28, 2016 1:34 am

Maximum character limit 60000 gg.

Chapter 8
Mentality


Section 8.0: Introduction

Mental state and psychology are tied pretty closely to goaltending when it comes to facing meta shots, staying objective, and staying focused. It is a daunting task for some people and that is why the goalie position as a whole is just not for every person. You need to accept that you can do everything that is considered right and still get scored on. You need to accept that every goal let in is at least partially your fault. You need to accept that shit is going to happen and you cannot let a previous goal cloud your objectivity when you are the last line of defense for your team. That is not to say that adjusting what you did is wrong in all cases, but only when it is putting yourself at a lower probability to save the shot.

Section 8.1: Why That Skater Scores on You Easily

Every goalie has some skaters that can score on them more easily than they should be able to. For me personally, I would say it is htcp and watermelon, and while they are great scorers that is not saying I think they are the best scorers, it is just that they score on me specifically more than another skater who is regarded as better offense than them would on me. This is typically for skaters who you regard highly but it isn’t always the case, and I’m sure most skaters feel the same way about certain goalies. Around the time of the 3k tournament, htcp could score on me really easily for some reason, I noticed that when other people took the shots he was taking I would only boost when htcp did the shot and not for the other people. I also realized he was able to stay in threatening angle positions more than most people would, and that he would shoot somewhat predictably if I did a certain sequence of moves. I had bias clouding my objectivity, and it caused me to believe that he was doing something that I could not handle, which a goalie cannot allow to happen. If you find yourself saying “I can never save his shots” or “I can never score on that goalie,” I can wholeheartedly guarantee that if another goalie or skater with a different name did exactly what your person did, you would have much better results. Using that knowledge you have to try your very best to remain objective and make the smartest decision to save the shot. Once you realize what you are doing that the skater is exploiting you can adjust your goaltending like you would for any other skater. For me personally, a significant amount of overcoming this just came down to focus, although different things will work for different people.

Section 8.2: Confidence

Without confidence in your ability, you will more than likely hesitate or react too quickly to many of your decisions. It will also cause you to overrate the skaters you are playing against and in turn create bias in your mind that it comes down to luck whether their shots go in or not. The easier you think a skater can score on you, the easier they will score on you and vice versa. “Confidence is everything in this game, if you don’t think you can, you won’t” – Jerry West. I don’t need to explain this section to any one that has played a sport competitively before.

Section 8.3: Preventing “Cracking”

There are two types of being cracked as a goalie. One is where you lose confidence usually from letting bias towards certain skaters cloud your judgement, or blaming your defense to the point where you lose complete trust in them and make suboptimal decisions. The other is known as tilting in most other games, and it is very easy to let happen as a goalie. This is when you allow each goal to frustrate you to the point where you play worse, to the point where you cannot focus, and continue to allow it to happen like a domino effect. I say allow because it is completely in your power to not let this happen if you are aware of it. I've never had this happen to me in zealot hockey but I do know this feeling from playing Heroes of the Storm. I was stuck at rank 3-8 for a week or so and I noticed my match history was almost entirely streaks of 4-10 both wins and losses. I started to realize in the games I was losing I would play way more aggressively and impatiently, while also being more toxic to my team. Once I stopped doing that I hit rank 1 in the same day and went around 70 wins above losing rank 1 within the next month. It comes down to maintaining confidence in yourself, focusing hard enough on the game to remain objective, and catching yourself if you aren't playing like you normally do.

Section 8.4: Preventing Boredom

When learning the goalie position, it is really fun to see your progress improve, but after a while it becomes quite stagnant. You need to find ways to actively try to improve yourself or else it can become dull pretty fast, unless you are constantly in games where your potential is being tested. In IH’s I had a rule where I would only troll a game if my team was leading by 3 and stop when we were leading by 2. When I say troll I don’t mean throwing the game but just play a lot more freely like how Proster usually goaltends. I did this to help resist the urge to play out of the ordinary in more serious IH games as an outlet, and also because it often helped balance the game for a close 3rd period. For people used to a more active position like skater, this method could definitely be used as a way to prevent being burned out of the position. Most people don’t mind it since it’s only when your team is in the lead, and goalies are a rare commodity in most IH’s.

Section 8.5: Conclusion

Goalie is a position that is tied to mental strength nearly as much as it is to reaction speed. You need to be a goalie that cannot be cracked if you want to be a top goalie, and that is completely up to your emotional control. After a goal instead of thinking negatively about it, think objectively why the shot went in and move on from it as quickly as you can without letting it cloud your judgement.


Chapter 9
Accelerating Improvement


Section 9.0: Introduction

You now know (almost) everything the great overrated ResSlayer knows about goaltending in Zealot Hockey. It’s just a matter of how much time you are willing to commit into becoming a better goalie. I definitely did not reach the skill ceiling of what is possible, and I'm hoping goalies will amaze me in future zhl seasons. Many strategies outlined in this chapter are used in nearly everything in real life and in other games that you are trying to improve.

Section 9.1: Practice and Critical Thinking

The Webster definition of skill is “the ability to do something that comes from training, experience, or practice.” It is ultimately what becoming better comes down to, everything else is supplemental and makes your practice more effective. While you are practicing, it is also important to critically think about what is happening throughout your games. Some things you should be thinking about are: what you are doing when you save a shot, what you are doing when a shot goes in, if you were the primary reason why the goal went in, if your action was worth the risk whether it was a save or not, would you have saved that shot if you thought the skater was someone else, etc.

Section 9.2: Replay Analysis

A worthy replay properly analyzed can potentially improve your goaltending more than 100 games would have. When I was first learning goalie, I would save around 5-10% of my replays and go through the shots that had me wondering why I couldn't save them or what I could do to increase my chances next time. You may come across a certain stick fake that has always been making you boost, and you realize that if you turned your stick as well you had the angle covered without boosting. If a skater I was having trouble goaltending against did multiple drives against me, I would analyze what I was doing to make him do what he was doing, what angles I misjudged, what I was doing correct, etc. The possibilities are endless, but make sure to only save the ones that are worth your time as it can be time consuming.

Section 9.3: Playing the Opposite Role

Professional starcraft players don’t only play the one race they use in tournaments. They will usually practice the other two races to get a sense of what their opponents are thinking, and to better understand the probabilities of what build their opponents are going when they scout. In Heroes of the Storm, you need to play every hero in order to know what every hero is capable of during the game, whether it’s in laning phase or team fights. You are significantly disadvantaged if you haven’t played every hero to better understand what they are capable of. In hearthstone you need to play every class so you can more accurately weigh the probabilities of what they have in their deck, and how they synergize with each other. The list goes on and also applies to real life sports as well. Zealot Hockey is no exception, and if you play as a skater while learning goalie you can better understand what they are capable of. Note that in the vice versa situation it helps the skater much more, and it's not a coincidence that all the first round picks regardless of position can play the goalie position fairly well to very well.

Section 9.4: Learning From Other Goalies

While I have never been coached as a goalie, I definitely learned a lot from goalies such as Eldersage, Townkrier, Gandalf and many more. There is usually 8 minutes of game time where your team is on offense, which should be used analyzing the opposing goalie if you don’t have anything else to do. Compare your styles and see what is working for him in the situations he is presented with. If he’s doing something wrong make a mental note to not do it yourself.

Section 9.5: Distinguishing Fault

Knowing whether or not you are responsible for a shot going in is very important. I believe it is healthy to your improvement to view every shot that goes in as at least 25% your own fault. If a shot goes in when it is 75% the defense’s fault and 25% your fault, you shouldn’t change what you do the next time the same thing happens just cause the shot went in. The example given in Chapter 5 is very applicable where one defender is trying to cover a one timer lane and you can clearly see that it isn't covered. Assuming he did land the pass, you chose to cover the snipe angle instead of the one timer, and it was past your point of reaction, this shot would have went in. Even though it is primarily the defense's fault for not covering the lane, it is also your fault for not recognizing the probabilities were against you. However if you thought the puck holder was more of a greedy player or not comfortable passing depending how much space there was, staying on the sniping angle would be correct as it gave you the highest % chance to save the shot even though the shot went in. This is just one example, and there are many situations where you will, and should find yourself asking the question of whose fault it was. It is also healthy to your improvement as a goalie to try to stay objective in this process, and to not publicly blame your defense as it will just make you bias towards the situations you face. It does not help your improvement as a goalie at all and will more likely than not cause you to make lower probability decisions. Don’t focus on how bad everyone's defense is, if it really is that bad figure out how you can work around it the best you can, or even use it to your advantage.

Section 9.6: Improving Reaction Time

It is scientifically proven that the average human will react faster to changes in the peripheral vision. I found it to be true for myself when testing my reaction speed and more than likely you will have the same result. This is useful to improve your point of reaction for snipes when you notice that the current puck holder has held the puck without changing directions for a very long time. Use the human benchmark website and practice/critically think about what affects your own reaction time.

Upgrading to a 144 Hz monitor from a 60 Hz monitor made a huge difference to my in game reaction time. I increased from an average of 190ms to 160ms, but keep in mind your Hz will be bottlenecked by your FPS if it is not the same or higher.
[+] Reaction time improvement
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The Starcraft 2 arcade game “Starjeweled” is an excellent game to hone your reactive skills as a goalie. The game is essentially battlecraft combined with bejeweled. It requires you play the bejeweled board, while at the same time playing the battlecraft map, making decisions on what to make to counter your opponent. While the two may seem drastically different, I find the goalie position to be very similar to the game. The stresses you face from the split second decision making of the battlecraft board, to the split second reactions both direct and peripheral of the bejeweled board simultaneously, are great ways to practice and optimize your reaction speed as a goalie.

Section 9.7: Remedying Common Bad Habits

If you are struggling with first opportunity snipes and have made no progress after thoroughly learning and applying this guide, then I will provide coaching expanded on in the guide conclusion.

If you are struggling with using your boost too often play redline games. Do one game where you play as normal without thinking about anything, and another while only using z reactively and not pre emptively boosting, watch the replays of both games and compare the two. This will only work if the shooters take the shots that you have trouble preemptively boosting to, which means this will probably only work if you can stop first opportunity snipes.

If you are still struggling just keep practicing and it won’t be long until you find your own techniques to make you a great goalie.

Section 9.8: Conclusion

The vast majority of improvement comes down to how passionate you are about becoming better, how much you practice, and how effectively you use the time you've practiced. Everything else is just supplemental to help you practice more efficiently. Being a good goalie doesn’t require that much practice and it doesn't require you to know everything in this guide. Being a great goalie however means practicing until you have your own style completely locked down and proven in ZHL.


Guide Conclusion and Special Thanks

I feel like the goalie position is lackluster in our current zhl scene as there isn’t much competition. I want the zhl to have 10 goalies that are worthy of the 3rd round one day, and hopefully this guide will spark some interest from skaters looking for another role, or new players deciding what they want to play. I am hoping that not only goalies, but skaters will benefit from reading this guide, as understanding the goalie position will be beneficial to all players in zealot hockey. Remember that goaltending is all about analyzing situations, weighing probabilities, and taking both objective/subjective action accordingly depending on the situation.

PS: I got kind of lazy after the first 2 chapters and didn't really pay attention to wording/organization, if anything is confusing let me know and I’ll fix it.

If you are interested in a session of personal coaching send me a message through the forums *NOT IN GAME* and I will PM you in game whenever I have time. Don’t expect me to rush this as I am doing it for free and will do my best to get through everyone that is interested. I will prioritize people that have played in probe league in season 5 or season 6, and give more priority to people that play pubs/ihs actively.

I’d like to thank Burchester, Yoda and 3D in general for letting me be a part of a great community and getting me into the ih scene when I started back in season 5, Yoda again for proofreading, Eldersage for being my main goalie inspiration when I first started, themusic for being an amazing and friendly dev that has done so much for the game, Watermelon and Vapour for helping me record the visuals, Fruits for letting me be apart of a great zealot hockey team in the 3K tourney, Droplets for potential korean BBQ, CountryKen for being #1 manager NA and #1 falstad 1v5er, ResSlayer for being Gozaburo’s smurf, 416 cause you gotta rep the 6, Rush for being a coward, and everyone else from the zealot community I’ve become friends with. I hope everyone can take something away from this guide, and a few potentially amazing goalies use it to accelerate their progress. It is now unfortunately time to grace and/or terrorize the rink with ResSkater.
Last edited by ResSlayer on Mon Mar 21, 2016 2:03 pm, edited 7 times in total.
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Re: Goalie Bible

Post by Cubs » Sun Feb 28, 2016 2:31 am

.
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im the kid thatd jump a kid like you
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Re: Goalie Bible

Post by Navyseals » Sun Feb 28, 2016 3:06 am

Sweet mary mother of jesus christ. The prophecy fortold us of a book crafted by the zealot hockey goalie gods.
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Re: Goalie Bible

Post by ZachSmack » Sun Feb 28, 2016 3:38 am

By far the most comprehensive guide for zh to date, skimmed a good portion of it and read a few chapters that helped me understand the mindset of goalies a little better.
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Re: Goalie Bible

Post by MoS » Sun Feb 28, 2016 8:52 am

Impressive and smartly written.
I am not a goalie myself but I couldn't emphasize enough how important it is to be in the mind of the attacker. Successfully making difficult saves twice or three times in a row on a top attacker can win you the whole game, in the sense that he will lose his confidence.
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Re: Goalie Bible

Post by DerrocK » Sun Feb 28, 2016 10:57 am

truly a bible kudos to you
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Narcissism at its best
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Re: Goalie Bible

Post by Bulbasaaur » Sun Feb 28, 2016 11:02 am

time to become god tier goalie…
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Re: Goalie Bible

Post by Tenkz » Sun Feb 28, 2016 1:06 pm

this guide is invalid because the author has 160ms reaction time
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Re: Goalie Bible

Post by ResSlayer » Sun Feb 28, 2016 2:09 pm

Added colour coordination, hid all images with spoilers to reduce lag, fixed gifs that didn't convert properly.
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