NSIC's Guide to Passing

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NSIC
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NSIC's Guide to Passing

Post by NSIC » Fri Oct 10, 2014 10:27 am

I dedicate this guide to Bulbasaur and Droplets -- may it provide us relief from the disease that ravages what we hold dear.

Disclaimer: I know I suck. But, I do know how magic can be had.

I love ZH. It’s beautifully simple and yet, allows for deep expression. I also love teamwork and I know you do too. ZH IH games comes in a spectrum of quality; ranging from zeeTrolling all the way to world class ecstasy. My hope is to get us all directed to ecstasy on a repeatable basis.
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The Principle of UnSelfishness – we need a meme like “dat US soooo good”

Passing is born from two traits, skill and unselfishness – unselfishness being a primary concern. We all want to touch the puck and make amazing plays, why else would we be playing ZH? Some of us try to do it alone, but that is not the way.

When we realize, as a team, that unselfish play allows for magic, than magic can occur. Magic being those goals that provoke a physical jubilee. I’m talking comebacks, I’m talking 1on1 with goalie, I’m talking clutch nail-biters in the third.

Unselfish play reinforces itself. When you pass the puck around, it no longer becomes an issue of getting that possession time because you know you’ll get it back at any moment.

Some of you might be saying: “Goals be everything right?” I say nay. While goals are good, teamwork with a goal is infinitely better! It’s also worth noting that any pro team worth its merit will shut down any solo player – I don’t care if you splice the genome of maha, vap, watermelon, kurt, proster, etc. Getting a shot on goal past 3 skilled defenders and a goalie requires teamwork.

Reinforce unselfish behavior with positive feedback whenever you see it! -- For the love of the game.

When to pass
We pass to beat the defense. Let me say it again, we pass to beat the defense. This is how games are won.

Passing
It takes skill, but keep trying even if you suck. We are all developing players so don’t let anyone make you feel bad for trying. Just show them up a few months from now when your play is clean. As players continue to progress the game and perhaps attend million dollar global tournaments (one can hope) we will perhaps laugh at what is considered “pro"

Some bullet points:
1. Map awareness – look left and right, forward and backward, see what’s going on. Look for the plays; Take off the tunnel vision glasses! A lot of times the window of opportunity will be open for milliseconds. DON’T DELAY THE PASS!

I die a little every time this happens
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2. Use wall – wall is best tool for getting the pass up when you have a defender in between. This is an essential skill for anyone wanting to progress their game. Pay attention in geometry class.
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3. Pass up – we want to beat the defense so don’t delay passes by going back. If the pass up is available, DO IT. An exception is the goalie pass which can be quickly re-directed to get the puck up or can be used in a pinch.

4. Use goalie -- goalie wants to play and can be a great asset. Goalie should have stick out ready to receive any passes, especially if the teammate is behind the goal line.
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5. Thread it – once you got skills.
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6. One timer passing – once you got skills.

7. Take notes – remember good passes that you see in game and try to replicate it when the opportunity presents itself.

Passing Technique

1.Stick angle matters
a. Often times the clutch pass is only available from a certain angle. Repositioning the zealot can give the extra degrees needed to change a "lol you suck" pass to "have my babies" pass. Position your zealot at the last second before pass.
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2.Don't force it
a. Don't force the pass if its not there, its not worth a turn over. Sometimes pulling back will open up an opportunity.
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3. Strength of passes – strong pass can be accurate. Soft pass to space may be what’s needed.

4.Lead the player -- players be moving.
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A lesson in Geometry
The physics of wall passes is a reflection of the angle of incidence. The effect of the angle if your close to the wall or far away is the same. Remember to utilize both walls no matter where you are on the field.
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Examples of large and small angles. Use both walls depending on where the defenders are.
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Common Misconceptions about passing

1. Only pass when they are far away. Why would I pass if he’s next to me?
a. This is wrong. Passing creates interesting phenomena. It requires the defense to re-read the situation—this is a good thing as it makes it harder to adapt. Also, your teammate may have his boost ready to get into position for 1on1 or open shot or a better angle for passing up. I cannot count the number of times that I have died inside because players don’t realize the potential of short passes.

Had the short pass been made I would of had the angle for passing up or a a shot on goal.
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2. I should dribble it up myself and then make the pass right?
a. This is wrong. We pass to beat the defense. If you dribble it up, you give time for the defense to get in position. We don’t want the defense in position! I lose sleep at night thinking about this.

This is how fast the defense to offense transition should be. Please please please do not think that holding it for an extra few seconds doesn't hurt because it does. Look at the defense scramble on this one :lol:
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3. I’m elite-top-pro-allstar, feed me the puck
a. Yea okay, you can score. But, are you fun to play with? Many pros are fun to play with, but it gets annoying when they set up a tent and fire in front of the enemy goal box. Rotate man, and give others a chance to be pro too instead of just claiming all shots on goal as a pass.
b. It’s also a positive feedback loop. Are you pro because you’re good or because you claim all the passes so you have 10x the practice? 4th defender too good.

4. Don’t pass to people unskilled. They suck right?
a. Well, people can learn and that means they need opportunities to make plays and make mistakes to learn from them. Apply the appropriate amount of criticism and remember when you sucked.

5. My teammate is guarded, don’t pass to him.
a. Depends on the situation, but if the player is not the last man, sometimes the gamble is worth it. It could go either way, but those quick boosts or steal-backs can be OP.

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6. Is there such thing as too much passing?
a. Yes there is actually -- but its as rare as a garden gnome in the arctic. What I am advocating is balance. If the shot is open take it, but always be aware of whats happening and you will become legend.


ZH is a team sport. If you don’t like it maybe you should redline.

Believe in comebacks and respect the sanctity of IH,
NSIC (N-SICCCCCk or NSYNC) :lol:

Passing Porn Soon to Come..
Last edited by NSIC on Mon Nov 03, 2014 10:45 am, edited 31 times in total.
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xNCrush
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Re: NSIC's Guide to Passing

Post by xNCrush » Fri Oct 10, 2014 12:49 pm

Alternative post title: "gigipopper pls read this"

Great post man.

Some add-ons:
NSIC wrote:A lot of times the window of opportunity will be open for milliseconds. DON’T DELAY THE PASS!
This cannot be stressed enough. Windows open very briefly, and far too often you see players hold too long, and a great opportunity passes by, after which the other team has recovered into defensive positions and it will be much more difficult to score. Split second decision making is vital.
NSIC wrote:Use goalie -- goalie wants to play and can be a great asset.
This is a great idea, just be careful when you pass it back to the goalie that:
a) the goalie has finished positioning themselves and isn't going to move again
b) the pass to the goalie is soft (if possible) so that in case you do risk an own goal, the goalie can recover

There are also some extremely dangerous situations in which you should NOT pass.

You should be VERY careful crossing it in any situation where the enemy player is very close to the intended receiver of the pass and you and the receiver are in vulnerable positions if the enemy player picks off the pass. You'll see it a fair bit where Player 1 tries to pass to Player 2, but Player A from the other team boosts between them to intercept and has a clear lane to the net, and both Player 1 and Player 2 are in poor position to come back defensively. The solution here is to ensure that either you have someone on your team behind you that can fall back defensively in this situation, or if you (as the passer) are the last line of defense, opt to chip a pass off the boards instead of throwing it dangerously across the middle of the ice.

It's better to throw a puck away into open ice than to turn it over to an attacking player and giving them a great chance to score. But if your teammates are doing a good job of keeping up the triangle, you'll almost always have at least one decent passing option.
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Re: NSIC's Guide to Passing

Post by Watermelon » Fri Oct 10, 2014 2:28 pm

I like the guide, except for this part:
NSIC wrote: 3. I’m elite-top-pro-allstar, feed me the puck
a. Yea okay, you can score. But, are you fun to play with? Many pros are fun to play with, but it gets annoying when they set up a tent and fire in front of the enemy goal box. Rotate man, and give others a chance to be pro too instead of just claiming all shots on goal as a pass.

I disagree with this sentiment.

I've observed how ZH meta-game changes as the player pool gets higher and higher in average skill. In low-tier inhouses, people get upset when this strategy is used ("qq you stole my goal wow").

As you climb the skill spectrum of inhouses, this becomes less and less prevalent. I believe it is for the following reasons:

1. It works.
Top tier inhouses generally have top tier goalies. These goalies will, 9 times out of 10, block obvious snipes. So, what's a good strategy to counter this? Fake snipe to a teammate, who then uses their Z to slam the puck wherever the goalie isn't.

2. Unselfishness
One of the reasons that good players are good is they do what's best for the team, not for themselves. The strategy in question, something you'd call goal-stealing and I'd call posting up (like in basketball), is one of the most effective strategies for scoring goals on top level goalies. Good players recognize this, and since they are unselfish, they don't mind their goals getting "stolen". In fact, many adapt and start feeding the player who is posting up. Watch any game where I get the opportunity to play with PeterDLai, PrOsTeR, or Maharishi, and you'll see this concept at it's highest level.

The fact is: I've only ever had mediocre players accuse me of goal stealing. If you really want to get better at passing, you need to recognize good strategy for what it is, instead of being selfish (and claiming unselfishness) by accusing someone of stealing your offensive opportunities.
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Re: NSIC's Guide to Passing

Post by ZachSmack » Fri Oct 10, 2014 3:47 pm

Great guide 10/10 taught me everything I know, thank you NSync
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Re: NSIC's Guide to Passing

Post by NSIC » Fri Oct 10, 2014 10:12 pm

Thank you for your comments.
xNCrush wrote: This is a great idea, just be careful when you pass it back to the goalie that:
a) the goalie has finished positioning themselves and isn't going to move again
b) the pass to the goalie is soft (if possible) so that in case you do risk an own goal, the goalie can recover
Good suggestions Crush. I would highlight that if your teammate has the puck and your playing goalie, it is best not to move at all. The fielder should be skilled enough to not mess up the pass back.
Watermelon wrote:I like the guide, except for this part:
NSIC wrote: 3. I’m elite-top-pro-allstar, feed me the puck
a. Yea okay, you can score. But, are you fun to play with? Many pros are fun to play with, but it gets annoying when they set up a tent and fire in front of the enemy goal box. Rotate man, and give others a chance to be pro too instead of just claiming all shots on goal as a pass.
I disagree with this sentiment.

I've observed how ZH meta-game changes as the player pool gets higher and higher in average skill. In low-tier inhouses, people get upset when this strategy is used ("qq you stole my goal wow").
Thank you for your comment Watermelon. I wasn't actually saying that the technique of "posting up" is bad. In fact, I think its a very useful play that can yield lots of goals. I also don't mind making the assist on that play -- assist is worth 2 imo (I would recommend that Reputed change the points for assists, but we all know how awesome the game updates are -- how much money have you made so far reputed?).

What I am complaining about is the frequency of such a play. Far too often I see players play the entire game in that position. Which is fine if you have fielders who only like permanent-D or permanent wing. But as someone who wants his turn to tear it up it can get incredibly frustrating to see the same positioning play after play.

It gets to the point that if I want to get my practice in as striker I have to forfeit last man D which than becomes a liability to the team. My hope would be that a cohesive team would rotate and allow for dynamic positioning.

I would also consider that many of Peter's goals are from distance.

Also, still waiting for your tutorial Watermelon on striker. :)
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Re: NSIC's Guide to Passing

Post by ZealotHockey » Sat Oct 11, 2014 6:26 am

résumé : use your damn neurons
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Re: NSIC's Guide to Passing

Post by DerrocK » Sat Oct 11, 2014 8:13 am

ZealotHockey wrote:résumé : use your damn neurons
Do we even have that?
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Re: NSIC's Guide to Passing

Post by NSIC » Sat Oct 11, 2014 11:56 pm

ZealotHockey wrote:résumé : use your damn neurons
Haha, what may be obvious to some is not necessarily obvious to others.

This guide is incomplete. At this point I would consider it a philosophy. Examples of rek em passing will be forth coming.
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Re: NSIC's Guide to Passing

Post by Anglefire » Tue Oct 14, 2014 12:05 am

I attend NSIC's school for gifted shooters. Right now im majoring in passing and finding lanes.
Us students are called the N-Men. :)
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Re: NSIC's Guide to Passing

Post by Illusion » Sat Nov 01, 2014 10:50 am

i'm already averaging nearly 1.5 passes a game after this guide. THANKS ;)
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